Integrated Biosensors

February 26, 2007
Time: 2:30pm-3:30pm
414 - CEPSR
Hosted by: Columbia Integrated System Laboratory
Speaker: Prof. Khaled Salama, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Abstract

Over the past few years, we have witnessed a significant increase in research on biological systems by engineers for environmental and biomedical diagnostics. The research span a wide field ranging from biologically inspired systems (such as silicon retinas and cochleae), through electronic instrumentation of biological phenomena (such as DNA microarrays and chemical sensors) to man-machine interfaces (such as deep brain array stimulators and neuroprosthetic devices). Despite efforts to develop chips for biological assay detection, there continues to be a need to improve implementations of micro-scale detection and processing systems for further convenience, scaling and portability. These devices will lead to a significant cost-savings, throughput increases, and enable heretofore infeasible biological assays making "in the field" biological testing a reality. Thus infectious diseases can be detected rapidly and accurately onsite potentially averting the spread of illnesses or tainted foodstuffs.

We will present the design and implementation of monolithic and hybrid sensors using integrated circuits, particularly in CMOS. We will begin by providing the definitions and performance metrics of sensors. Subsequently, we will discuss the advantages and shortcomings of sensors built in silicon-based fabrication processes and examine, in detail, their integrated circuit topologies. Next, we will provide a comprehensive study of the design and analysis of CMOS integrated image sensors, integrated biosensors, and electronic backbone of MEMS hybrid sensors including silicon photodetectors; CCD and CMOS sensor architectures and circuits; affinity-based detection and biochemical transduction, integrated microarrays, biochips, and sensor SoCs.
 


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