Digital Signal Conditioning Techniques for the Analog Circuit Designer

April 23, 2010
Time: 12:00pm-2:00pm
414 CESPR/Schapiro
Speaker: Dr. Sudhakar Pamarti, University of California at Los Angeles

Abstract

Mixed-signal circuits are critical components in most electronic systems. Aggressive integrated circuit technology scaling has placed on them both tremendous performance demands and severe challenges such as transistor non-linearity, process variability etc. This talk will present a choice selection of digital signal processing techniques that exploit the relative abundance of inexpensive digital logic to overcome the aforementioned challenges and enable high performance in mixed-signal circuits. Specifically, techniques that "condition" the statistical properties of signals being processed by the mixed-signal circuits, making them inherently immune to circuit imperfections, will be described. Example applications to frequency synthesizers, power amplifiers, and wired communication transceivers will be presented.

Speaker Biography

Dr. Sudhakar Pamarti is an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he teaches and conducts research in the fields of mixed-signal circuit design and signal processing. Dr. Pamarti received the M.S. and the Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of California at San Diego in 1999 and 2003, respectively, and the Bachelor of Technology degree in electronics and electrical communications engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1995. Prior to joining UCLA, he has worked at Rambus Inc. (‘03-`05) and Hughes Software Systems (‘95-`97) developing high speed I/O circuits and embedded software and firmware for a wireless-in-local-loop communication system respectively. Dr. Pamarti has served on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II and is a recent recipient of the NSF CAREER award.


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